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Simon armitage hitcher essay help

May 5, 2018

Analysis of Hitcher by Simon Armitage

In the first stanza of ‘Hitcher’ shows the reader that the narrator is seeking a more relaxed lifestyle, and is unable to deal with the arduous tasks of everyday life. He states that he had been 'tired, under/the weather', but not especially ill, and therefore should not be taking time off work. He ignores all calls from work, and says that the answerphone 'screaming' that he will be fired if he continues to behave unprofessionally. He himself hitches a lift to the place where he has a hired car parked, which could be seen as foreshadowing the following events.
The first line of stanza two abruptly introduces the hitcher: 'I picked him up in Leeds'; the hitcher is only ever referred to as 'him' or 'he', showing the narrator’s lack of acknowledgement of the hitcher as an individual. He is said to be, 'following the sun', he sleeps outside, on 'the good earth'. He explains to the driver that truth is 'blowin' in the wind', which is quoted from a Bob Dylan quote of the 60s, an era of free spirit. The narrator contradicts this, saying that truth is in fact 'round the next bend', foreshadowing the horrors that follow and creating tension.

Stanza three conveys the narrator’s envy and anger at finding someone who he believes to have a life of total freedom, the lifestyle that he desires. 'I let him have it' is a blunt and colloquial introduction into his violent attack on the hitcher, in which he head-butts him before hitting him 'six times with the krooklok', directly in the face. This ruthless and somewhat emotionless attack is shown by the narrator’s statement that he, 'didn't even swerve' during the attack; which could show the narrator’s sense of proudness in his actions.

Armitage uses enjambment to link the third stanza to the fourth, as the narrator describes how he pushed the hitcher out of the car whilst in third gear and watched him 'bouncing off the kerb'. The statement 'We were the same age, give or take a week' tells us that the narrator obviously... Continue Reading

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In the first stanza of ‘Hitcher’ shows the reader that the narrator is seeking a more relaxed lifestyle, and is unable to deal with the arduous tasks of everyday life. He states that he had been 'tired, under/the weather', but not especially ill, and therefore should not be taking time off work. He ignores all calls from work, and says that the answerphone 'screaming' that he will be fired if he continues to behave unprofessionally. He himself hitches a lift to the place where he has a hired car parked, which could be seen as foreshadowing the following events.The first line of stanza two abruptly introduces the hitcher: 'I picked him up in Leeds'; the hitcher is only ever referred to as 'him' or 'he', showing the narrator’s lack of acknowledgement of the hitcher as an individual. He is said to be, 'following the sun', he sleeps outside, on 'the good earth'. He explains to the driver that truth is 'blowin' in the wind', which is quoted from a Bob Dylan quote of the 60s, an era of free spirit. The narrator contradicts this, saying that truth is in fact 'round the next bend', foreshadowing the horrors that follow and creating tension.Stanza three conveys the narrator’s envy and anger at finding someone who he believes to have a life of total freedom, the lifestyle that he desires. 'I let him have it' is a blunt and colloquial introduction into his violent attack on the hitcher, in which he head-butts him before hitting him 'six times with the krooklok', directly in the face. This ruthless and somewhat emotionless attack is shown by the narrator’s statement that he, 'didn't even swerve' during the attack; which could show the narrator’s sense of proudness in his actions.Armitage uses enjambment to link the third stanza to the fourth, as the narrator describes how he pushed the hitcher out of the car whilst in third gear and watched him 'bouncing off the kerb'. The statement 'We were the same age, give or take a week' tells us that the narrator obviously...


Jornalista por formação e blogueira de casamento por amor. Em 10 anos de profissão, me apaixonei pela arte de contar histórias. No meio do caminho conheci meu marido, me apaixonei pela Serra e pelos preparativos do meu casamento. Participei ativamente das escolhas e agora inverto o meu papel. Passo a dividir as minhas próprias inspirações, referências, dicas e muito mais.

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Jornalista por formação e blogueira de casamento por amor. Em 10 anos de profissão, me apaixonei pela arte de contar histórias. No meio do caminho conheci meu marido, me apaixonei pela Serra e pelos preparativos do meu casamento. Participei ativamente das escolhas e agora inverto o meu papel. Passo a dividir as minhas próprias inspirações, referências, dicas e muito mais.

Our greatest fear should not be of failure... but of succeeding at things in life that don't really matter. Francis Chan

A powerpoint with Simon Armitage's poem Hitcher with graphics included. Contains some analysis activities using quotes from the poem to show what this reveals about character and motive. Prompt questions on form are also provided prior to listing a series of statements about the poem's message for debate by students in order to elicit a personal response.

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