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Cuban missile crisis negotiations essay help

May 26, 2018

Cuban Missile Crisis


The Cuban missile crisis was a dangerous and confrontation involving the Soviet Union and the United States. The crisis occurred in 1962. This was during the era during which there was the cold war. The conflict and disagreements were serious and featured miscommunications, miscalculations, secret communications and secret calculations. The United States had attempted overthrowing the Castro regime in Cuba but had failed. A secret agreement was reached between Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev and Cuban Fidel Castro about deterring any future invasion by the United States by placing missiles in Cuba. Several Missiles construction sites thus commenced in Cuba. However, the sites were discovered by the United States. The United States also discovered that the Soviet Union was in support of the missiles in Cuba. After the discovery of the missiles in Cuba, it was followed by President’s Kennedy warning. The warning, however, did not deter the Cuba efforts for missile sites construction. This initiated and precipitated the start or commencement of the Cuban missile war.

United States Role in the Cuban Missiles Crisis


The United States played a vital and important role in the attempt to prevent the construction of missile sites in Cuba. Kennedy consulted with some of his closest advisors to see the best course of action to eradicate with the Cuban Missile Crisis. Different advisors offered different solutions that could possibly be helpful. Some proposed destruction of constructed sites and those that were under construction. Others proposed that the issue of stern warnings would help to contain the situation. Kennedy decided to write to the Cuban president and clarified that their actions about missile site construction sites would not be accepted. He then asked the Soviets to destroy the sites completely. A naval quarantine was issued against Cuba. President Kennedy then made the issue public in the Nation Television.

Soviet Union Role in Cuban Missile Crisis


Khrushchev, the Soviets Premier, wrote to Kennedy saying that the blockade against Cuba was aggressive. He then reached the national television that got to the white house indicating that the Soviets would negotiate with the United States and then they would agree to destroy all the missile sites in Cuba. After a long struggle and negotiations between the United States and Soviet Union, the Soviets decided to destroy the missiles in Cuba. This was after Khrushchev publicly announced that the missiles would be destroyed and dismantled. This saw the end of the Cuban Missile war.

Negotiations of the Cuban Missile Crisis

Introduction
By 1962, the Soviet Union was considerably behind the United States in the nuclear arms race. The Soviet Union had limited range missiles that were only capable of being launched against Europe, but the United States possessed missiles that were capable of striking anywhere within the entire Soviet Union. As it is often said, when it comes to national security, leaders sometimes make irrational decisions. In an effort to restore the balance of power Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev devised the idea of placing intermediate-range missiles in Cuba (14 days in October). This deployment of weapons in Cuba would double the Soviet strategic arsenal and provide a credible deterrent to a potential U.S. attack against the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union was able to capitalize on Fidel Castro’s fear that the United States was out to overthrow his socialist government. For the United States, having a communist country in the Western Hemisphere was an embarrassment and national security risk. The Soviet Union presented this plan to Cuba as insurance against a United States invasion, such as the failed attempt at the Bay of Pigs in 1961. Realizing that this was the best means of holding onto power in Cuba against a belligerent neighbor, Fidel Castro accepted the proposal, thus the Soviet Union worked quickly and secretly to build missile installations in Cuba. On October 16, 1962. President John F. Kennedy discovered through reconnaissance photographs that the Soviet Union was constructing missile installations on Cuban soil. This meant that only 90 miles of ocean separated the United States from nuclear missiles. In response to this threat, President Kennedy organized the Executive Committee (EX-COMM), which was comprised from Kennedy’s twelve most important advisors to help manage the crisis (14 days in October). For seven days there was considerable and intense debate as to how the United States should respond to this threat. Not surprisingly, his advisors both civilian and militarily, differed as to the appropriate course of action. Options considered in response to this crisis ranged from an armed invasion of Cuba to air strikes. Kennedy decided on a less confrontational response. President Kennedy ordered a naval quarantine or blockade around Cuba that would prevent the arrival of more Soviet offensive weapons to the island. On October 22, President Kennedy publicly announced the discovery of the missile installations and his decision to quarantine Cuba. He also proclaimed that any nuclear missile launched from Cuban island would be regarded as an attack on the United States by the Soviet Union. Additionally the United States demanded that the Soviets remove all of their offensive weapons from Cuba. The Soviets responded by authorizing their field commanders in Cuba to launch their tactical nuclear weapons if invaded by U.S. forces. This precipitated the closest time in history that the danger of nuclear war was at its highest. The fate of millions of people rested on the ability of two men, President John F. Kennedy and Premier Nikita Khrushchev to negotiate a compromise during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During the crisis, the United States and Soviet Union were involved in intense negotiations through letters, agents and other types of communications, both formal and "back channel." Premier Khrushchev sent letters to Kennedy on October 23 and 24 indicating the peaceful intention of the missiles in Cuba as means of justifying the presence of Soviet arms in Cuba. On October 26, Khrushchev sent Kennedy a letter proposing that the missile installations would be dismantled in exchange for the guarantee that the United States would not invade Cuba. On October 27, another letter to Kennedy arrived from Khrushchev, proposing that missile installations in Cuba would be dismantled if the United States removed its missile installations from Turkey. Tensions finally began to ease on October 28... Continue Reading

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IntroductionBy 1962, the Soviet Union was considerably behind the United States in the nuclear arms race. The Soviet Union had limited range missiles that were only capable of being launched against Europe, but the United States possessed missiles that were capable of striking anywhere within the entire Soviet Union. As it is often said, when it comes to national security, leaders sometimes make irrational decisions. In an effort to restore the balance of power Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev devised the idea of placing intermediate-range missiles in Cuba (14 days in October). This deployment of weapons in Cuba would double the Soviet strategic arsenal and provide a credible deterrent to a potential U.S. attack against the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union was able to capitalize on Fidel Castro’s fear that the United States was out to overthrow his socialist government. For the United States, having a communist country in the Western Hemisphere was an embarrassment and national security risk. The Soviet Union presented this plan to Cuba as insurance against a United States invasion, such as the failed attempt at the Bay of Pigs in 1961. Realizing that this was the best means of holding onto power in Cuba against a belligerent neighbor, Fidel Castro accepted the proposal, thus the Soviet Union worked quickly and secretly to build missile installations in Cuba. On October 16, 1962. President John F. Kennedy discovered through reconnaissance photographs that the Soviet Union was constructing missile installations on Cuban soil. This meant that only 90 miles of ocean separated the United States from nuclear missiles. In response to this threat, President Kennedy organized the Executive Committee (EX-COMM), which was comprised from Kennedy’s twelve most important advisors to help manage the crisis (14 days in October). For seven days there was considerable and intense debate as to how the United States should respond to this threat. Not surprisingly, his advisors both civilian and militarily, differed as to the appropriate course of action. Options considered in response to this crisis ranged from an armed invasion of Cuba to air strikes. Kennedy decided on a less confrontational response. President Kennedy ordered a naval quarantine or blockade around Cuba that would prevent the arrival of more Soviet offensive weapons to the island. On October 22, President Kennedy publicly announced the discovery of the missile installations and his decision to quarantine Cuba. He also proclaimed that any nuclear missile launched from Cuban island would be regarded as an attack on the United States by the Soviet Union. Additionally the United States demanded that the Soviets remove all of their offensive weapons from Cuba. The Soviets responded by authorizing their field commanders in Cuba to launch their tactical nuclear weapons if invaded by U.S. forces. This precipitated the closest time in history that the danger of nuclear war was at its highest. The fate of millions of people rested on the ability of two men, President John F. Kennedy and Premier Nikita Khrushchev to negotiate a compromise during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During the crisis, the United States and Soviet Union were involved in intense negotiations through letters, agents and other types of communications, both formal and "back channel." Premier Khrushchev sent letters to Kennedy on October 23 and 24 indicating the peaceful intention of the missiles in Cuba as means of justifying the presence of Soviet arms in Cuba. On October 26, Khrushchev sent Kennedy a letter proposing that the missile installations would be dismantled in exchange for the guarantee that the United States would not invade Cuba. On October 27, another letter to Kennedy arrived from Khrushchev, proposing that missile installations in Cuba would be dismantled if the United States removed its missile installations from Turkey. Tensions finally began to ease on October 28...

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