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How to write a conclusion for an english literature essay gcse

Jun 14, 2018

This PPT goes over ways to structure and write a GCSE essay with examples using An Inspector Calls. We look at:

-What an essay is
-What needs to be included
-How to write an introduction with sample questions and example
-How to write a conclusion with example
-What to remember to do in the main body of the essay (with examples)
-An essay checklist

There are many key writing techniques required to achieve the best grades.

The video and text below look at some of the best technigues to help you achieve top marks

Essay Writing Tips Video Link

What are these techniques?

Good essay practice should include:-

Planning

Introduction

Paragraphing

Evidence

Quotations

Selection

Answer the question

Conclusion

Style

Be creative

CHECKLIST AFTER WRITING YOUR ESSAY

Have you:

Generally speaking to get good marks you have to do the following:

To get an A* you need to be insightful, sensitive, convincing and evaluative.

For an A you need to be analytical and exploratory.

For a B you need to sustain your answer linking details to what the writer is trying to say and thoughtfully consider the meanings of the texts.

For a C you need to structure your answer to the question, use details effectively to back up your ideas and make some appropriate comment on the meaning of the texts.

For a D you need to answer the question and explain your ideas with some supporting quotations from the text.

FORM

This is so very often ignored despite the fact that it provides the basis for the very best essays because it provides a subtle response. And subtlety always receives the highest marks!

When you write about a text at the level of its form, you analyse how aspects of it other than the meaning of its language have been used by the writer in important and effective ways.

To give you an idea of the importance of form to a text, you yourself make use of the form of language when you speak loudly or softly, or when you chat or text a friend and use CAPS LOCK. Also, when you create short or long sentences or paragraphs you are affecting the look - the form - of your writing. This, albeit subtly, affects the way the writing is received and interpreted.

Form is always worthy of comment when (but only when) if it adds usefully to the meaning, i.e. the content of a text.

 
CONTENT
Words have both form and content. Content is the meaning they contain. These two aspects are like two sides of the same coin. There are several ways that writers are able to make use of the content of language that are creative, interesting to readers and effective in engaging their attention:

Literal Meaning
Every word and phrase has a literal meaning. This is its basic dictionary meaning. It's sometimes called a word's denotation.

E.g. 'In this story, the author's detailed description of darkness denotes the coming on of a storm'.

Figurative Meaning
This is a way of 'playing' around with a word's meaning that makes writing more vivid, emotional and interesting. Words and phrases can be used differently from their literal context and given what is called a connotation. Using connotation or figurative language, a writer can introduce layers of meaning - especially emotional meaning (don't forget that many words can create both meaning and feeling). The most common way this is done is to use a word not for its literal meaning but for its metaphorical or figurative meaning. Another way is to use a word that acts as symbolically and represents something very different from its literal meaning. 

E.g. 'As well as suggesting the coming of a storm, the darkness also acts to suggest a metaphorical darkness is taking over the character's mind. In this way the darkness seems to be symbolising a kind of evil'.

Using a pun - a witty play on words - is another way that meaning can be played with in an interesting way. Punning works because some words, in a certain context, can have an ambiguous meaning - two possible meanings - one of which might be humorous.

Irony
Irony is a key way that writers use to create layers of meaning. Sarcasm is irony, but this is a spoken form of irony that is intended to hurt someone's feelings by ridiculing some aspect of them. It's a crude, easy kind of irony not really subtle enough for writing. Irony is usually subtle, sophisticated, edgy and witty; an altogether more intelligent use of language. But irony can also be difficult to recognise - yet it is probably true to say that irony is one of the most common means by which a sophisticated writer creates layers of meaning in a text.

Creating an 'ironic tone of voice' in writing is much harder than in speech because the original sound of voice and facial expression or body language of the speaker are absent. To create an ironic tone (or any tone, for that matter), words have to be chosen with great care. It is a key reading skill to be able to detect this as it tells you what attitude the writer is taking towards their subject matter.

 

STRUCTURE


The content of a text is never available immediately (except in a single word, maybe: STOP!). Meaning needs to be built up throughout a text in ways that are often important to the overall effect on the listener or reader. This is the structure of the text.

 

STYLE


Style

is the way a writer or speaker consciously chooses language and language features to suit a particular audience to achieve a specific purpose. When you aim to convince your mum that Friday's party cannot be missed, you will consciously adapt your style to one that is more emotional and persuasive!

To become truly great, one has to stand with people, not above them. Charles de Montesquieu

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