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How to write a good legal research proposal for masters degree

Apr 26, 2018

How to write a research proposal

If you wish to study for a Manchester PhD, you may need to submit a research proposal with your application. This is crucial in the assessment of your application and it warrants plenty of your time and energy.

Your research proposal should:

Typical proposals range between 1,000 and 1,500 words; however, we advise you to consult with your School for specific guidance on word count.

Structuring your research proposal

Please check with the relevant School for the specific conventions and expectations of your research proposal. The following are general considerations that we deem important:

Before submitting your research proposal

Contact an academic member of our staff to discuss your research proposal and key objectives before you submit your formal application. This will enable you to fine-tune your proposal and check that we can identify a suitable supervisory team for you.

Find out more about choosing a suitable supervisor.

Refining your proposal

When you submit your research proposal for application purposes, you will not be committing yourself to the precise detail or methodology. Once we accept you onto a PhD programme, you can refine your original proposal following discussions with your supervisory team.

Example research proposals are listed by category below.

History of Education


Karen Marais, 2005, EdD

From finishing school to feminist academy: the impact of changing social constructions of gender on education in a private girls' school in Western Australia, 1945 - 1997.



Ian Melville, 2006, PhD

An historical analysis of the structures established for the provision of Anglican education in the Diocese of Perth, Western Australia between 1917 and 1992.


Qualitative Longitudinal Study


Karen Anderson, 2005, EdD

The novice experience: Western Australian primary deputy principals' first year in school leadership and management.


Stefania Giamminuti, 2005, PhD

Documentation as a tool for co-constructing situated communities of learners: a case study of early years, educational environments in Reggio Emilia and Western Australia.


Jasmine McDonald, 2005, PhD

How parents deal with the education of their child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: a constructivist grounded theory study.


Shardlow Mignon, 2005, PhD

Teaching the watchdogs of democracy: The professional formation of journalists through Australian university study and early employment.



Point Qualitative Study

Debra Shilkin, 2005, EdD

Why we suspend: teachers' and administrators' perspectives on student suspensions.



Multiple-question Qualitative Study

Theresa Martin, 2006, EdD

Qualifications in education for TAFE lecturers in Western Australia: background, functions and concerns.



Quantitative Study

Jolee Boakes, 2005, PhD

Development and validation of the test battery to evaluate employability skills.


Charles Chew, 2005, EdD

Effects of biology-infused demonstrations on achievement and attitudes in junior college Physics.


Richard Hewison, 2005, EdD

Predictors of tertiary level performance in non-English speaking background students.


David Kwok, 2005, EdD

Profiles of high-performing call centre agents.


Joseph Njiru, 2005, PhD

Self-regulated learning in working with information and communication technology (ICT).


Delphine Shaw, 2005, EdD

Thinking patterns, pupil engagement, and understanding in early childhood.


Writing a Good PhD Research Proposal

What is a PhD proposal?

A PhD proposal is a an outline of your proposed project that is designed to:

Research proposals may vary in length, so it is important to check with the department(s) to which you are applying to check word limits and guidelines. Generally speaking, a proposal should be around 3,000 words which you write as part of the application process.

What is the research proposal for?

Potential supervisors, admissions tutors and/or funders use research proposals to assess the quality and originality of your ideas, your skills in critical thinking and the feasibility of the research project. Please bear in mind that PhD programmes in the UK are designed to be completed in three years (full time) or six years (part time). Think very carefully about the scope of your research and be prepared to explain how you will complete it within this timeframe.

Research proposals are also used to assess your expertise in the area in which you want to conduct research, you knowledge of the existing literature (and how your project will enhance it). Moreover, they are used to assess and assign appropriate supervision teams. If you are interested in the work of a particular potential supervisor – and especially if you have discussed your work with this person – be sure to mention this in your proposal. We encourage you strongly to identify a prospective supervisor and get in touch with them to discuss your proposal informally BEFORE making a formal application, to ensure it is of mutual interest and to gain input on the design, scope and feasibility of your project. Remember, however, that it may not be possible to guarantee that you are supervised by a specific academic.

Crucially, it is also an opportunity for you to communicate your passion in the subject area and to make a persuasive argument about what your project can accomplish. Although the proposal should include an outline, it should also be approached as a persuasive essay – that is, as an opportunity to establish the attention of readers and convince them of the importance of your project.

Is the research proposal ‘set in stone’?

No. Good PhD proposals evolve as the work progresses. It is normal for students to refine their original proposal in light of detailed literature reviews, further consideration of research approaches and comments received from the supervisors (and other academic staff). It is useful to view your proposal as an initial outline rather than a summary of the ‘final product’.

Structuring a Research Proposal

Please check carefully with each department to find out whether a specific template is provided or required. In general, however, the following elements are crucial in a good research proposal:

Title

This can change, but make sure to include important ‘key words’ that will relate your proposal to relevant potential supervisors, funding schemes and so on. Make sure that your title goes beyond simply describing the subject matter – it should give an indication of your approach or key questions.

Overview of the research

In this section you should provide a short overview of your research and where it fits within the existing academic discourses, debates or literature. Be as specific as possible in identifying influences or debates you wish to engage with, but try not to get lead astray into a long exegesis of specific sources. Rather, the point is to sketch out the context into which your work will fit.

You should also use this section to make links between your research and the existing strengths of the department to which you are applying. Visit appropriate websites to find out about existing research taking place in the department and how your project can complement this.

If applying to multiple departments, be sure to tailor a unique proposal to each department – readers can tell if a proposal has been produced for ‘mass consumption’!

Be sure to establish a solid and convincing framework for your research in this section. This should include:

Positioning of the research (approx. 900 words)

This section should discuss the texts which you believe are most important to the project, demonstrate your understanding of the research issues, and identify existing gaps (both theoretical and practical) that the research is intended to address. This section is intended to ‘sign-post’ and contextualize your research questions, not to provide a detailed analysis of existing debates.

Research design & methodology (approx. 900 words)

This section should lay out, in clear terms, the way in which you will structure your research and the specific methods you will use. Research design should include (but is not limited to):

A well developed methodology section is crucial, particularly if you intend to conduct significant empirical research. Be sure to include specific techniques, not just your general approach. This should include: kinds of resources consulted; methods for collecting and analyzing data; specific techniques (ie statistical analysis; semi-structured interviewing; participant observation); and (brief) rationale for adopting these methods.

References

Your references should provide the reader with a good sense of your grasp on the literature and how you can contribute to it. Be sure to reference texts and resources that you think will play a large role in your analysis. Remember that this is not simply a bibliography listing ‘everything written on the subject’. Rather, it should show critical reflection in the selection of appropriate texts.

Possible pitfalls

Quite often, students who fit the minimum entrance criteria fail to be accepted as PhD candidates as a result of weaknesses in the research proposal. To avoid this, keep the following advice in mind:

The following books are widely available from bookshops and libraries and may help in preparing your research proposal (as well as in doing your research degree):

Bell, J. (1999): Doing Your Research Project: A Guide for First-time Researchers in Education & Social Science, (Oxford University Press, Oxford).
Baxter, L, Hughes, C. and Tight, M. (2001): How to Research, (Open University Press, Milton Keynes).
Cryer, P. (2000): The Research Student's Guide to Success, (Open University, Milton Keynes).
Delamont, S., Atkinson, P. and Parry, O. (1997): Supervising the PhD, (Open University Press, Milton Keynes).
Philips, E. and Pugh, D. (2005): How to get a PhD: A Handbook for Students and their Supervisors, (Open University Press, Milton Keynes).

This article is based on material originally published at the One Hundred Thousand Words blog, used with kind permission.

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