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Ib math ia criteria 2014

Jun 11, 2018

The Group 5: Mathematics subjects of the IB Diploma Programme consist of four different mathematics courses.[1] To earn an IB Diploma, a candidate must take one of the following four mathematics courses: Mathematical Studies SL (Standard Level), Mathematics SL, Mathematics HL (Higher Level) or Further Mathematics HL.[2] Further Mathematics HL can also be taken as an elective in addition to Mathematics HL. The Computer science SL and HL courses, which were elective courses in group 5, is, for first examinations in 2014, a full course in group 4.[2]

Mathematical Studies SL

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Curriculum

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The Mathematical Studies SL course "is designed to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics in students" who do not expect mathematics to be a major component of their university studies.[3] Its curriculum consists of the following topics:[4]

Assessment

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The internal assessment for this course comprises 20% of the final mark and consists of a project that is "an individual piece of work involving the collection of information or the generation of measurement."[5] The project is intended to make up 20 hours of the overall classroom time for the course.[5]

The details for the external assessment exams, both of which evaluate a student's knowledge of the entire curriculum, are outlined in the table[6] below.

Exam Time limit # and type of questions  % of final mark Paper 1 (GDC required) 1 hour, 30 minutes 15 short response questions 40% Paper 2 (GDC required) 1 hour, 30 minutes 5 extended response questions 40%

Mathematics SL and HL

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Core curriculum for Mathematics SL and HL

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Mathematics SL is primarily intended for students who "expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as chemistry and business management,"[7] and its curriculum is a small subset of the Mathematics HL curriculum. Hence, students planning to apply for engineering subjects and Economics , especially to the top ivy league colleges, are not recommended to take Mathematics SL. Topics from the following areas form the common "Core curriculum" for both courses:[8][9]

In Mathematics SL, students are provided a minimum of 140 instructional hours on the topics from the Core.[10]

Additional requirements for Mathematics HL

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Mathematics, in the IB Diploma course, is one subject with the greatest difference in difficulty and analysis between SL and HL students. Hence, Mathematics HL is intended for students "with a good background in mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills,"[11] and who anticipate that mathematics will be "a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as physics, economics, engineering and technology."[11] Therefore, HL students study the Core topics in much greater depth than SL students and for a minimum of 190 instructional hours, studying at least one of the following optional topics ("Options"),[12] for a minimum of 40 additional instructional hours:[13]

Assessment

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In both courses, there is an internal assessment composed of mathematical investigation paper (formerly a portfolio of two papers), which is worth 20% of the student's final mark. The project is intended to comprise a combined total of 10 hours of the overall classroom time for both courses.[14][15]

The table[16][17] below outlines the external assessment requirements for both courses:

Course Exam Time limit Description # and type of questions  % of final mark Mathematics SL Paper 1 (no calculator) 1 hour, 30 minutes Section A ~7 short response questions 40% Section B ~3 extended response questions Paper 2 (GDC required) 1 hour, 30 minutes Section A ~7 short response questions 40% Section B ~3 extended response questions Mathematics HL Paper 1 (no calculator) 2 hours Section A ~10 short response questions 30% Section B ~5 extended response questions Paper 2 (GDC required) 2 hours Section A ~10 short response questions 30% Section B ~5 extended response questions Paper 3 (GDC required) 1 hour ~5 extended response questions 20%

In both courses, the Paper 1 and Paper 2 exams test students only on their knowledge of topics from the Core.[16][18] In Mathematics HL, the Paper 3 exam tests students specifically on their knowledge of the material from the Option selected by the school.[19] As of the May 2008 examinations, schools are required to register students for a specific Option in advance and the school is now provided only the examination paper for the registered Option.[20] In order for a student to be awarded full marks for an answer on any of the Mathematics SL or HL exams, accurate work must be shown.[21][22]

Further Mathematics HL

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Curriculum

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The Further Mathematics HL course (SL before 2014)[23] is designed for students with a high degree of competence and interest in mathematics, and who "intend to study mathematics at university, either as a subject in its own right or as a major component of a related subject."[24] Students who take this course most often also take Mathematics HL[25] and knowledge of all material from the Core curriculum of Mathematics HL is necessary and presumed, as well as knowledge of at least one of the four Options offered in Mathematics HL.[24] The curriculum for Further Mathematics HL includes all of the topics from all four of these Options,[26] for which 144 hours of instruction are allotted,[27] and additional topics from geometry and linear algebra,[28] for which 96 hours of instruction are allotted.[27] There are no optional topics in Further Mathematics HL.[27]

Assessment

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There is no internal assessment for this course. A summary of the required external assessment exams, both of which evaluate the student's knowledge of the entire curriculum, is provided in the table[29] below.

Exam Time limit Type of questions  % of final mark Paper 1 (GDC required) 2.5 hours Short response questions 50% Paper 2 (GDC required) 2.5 hours Extended response questions 50%

Computer science SL and HL

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Computer science is, from first exams in 2014, no longer an elective course in group 5 but a full course in group 4, and has an updated syllabus and assessment scheme. The courses' focus shifted away from "program construction in Java" and "computational thinking" now lies at the core of the course.[30]

Use of calculators on IB mathematics external assessments

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Students are permitted and expected to use a graphic display calculator (GDC) on some or all of their IB mathematics exams, depending on which course the student takes. Noting again that calculators are not permitted on the Paper 1 exam for both Mathematics SL and HL,[31] the IB offers the following guidance with regards to required GDC functionality on mathematics exams:

"A GDC with the following minimum functionalities is required on all other papers:

  • draw graphs with any viewing window
  • solve equations numerically
  • add and multiply and find inverse matrices
  • find a numerical derivative at a point
  • find a numerical definite integral
  • find p values (not required for mathematics SL).

Examiners will set questions assuming that all candidates have a GDC with the minimum functionalities listed here. Candidates using only four-function or scientific calculators, or a less able GDC will be at a disadvantage."[31]

All other types of calculators (such as those found on phones, watches, or PDAs, or those equipped with a Computer Algebra System (CAS)) are prohibited on all IB exams.[31] To be approved for use on IB exams, a GDC must have its memory cleared and all user-written/downloaded programs and applications must be removed (except for a limited number of specifically approved applications).[32] The list of approved applications primarily consists of native language support for users who are not English speakers, along with a small number of additional applications.[33]

Recommended models include the TI-83 Plus/TI-84 Plus families and 11 different non-CAS Casio GDCs,[34] as well as the non-CAS TI-Nspire either with TI-84 faceplate[35] or with the Nspire faceplate configured as described below.

While the TI-Nspire with Nspire faceplate was initially prohibited,[34] it was later authorized, provided the (non-CAS) GDC is equipped with version 1.3 of the operating software, has the "Press-to-Test" mode enabled (with "limit geometry functions" enabled), and has the green LED flashing. (A notice that reflected this change was posted on the IB Online Curriculum Center on 15 Sep 2008.)

References

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Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning. Albert Einstein

IB Math Studies ‎ > ‎

Internal Assessment

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IA Checklist_ Math Studies.pdf


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Feb 12, 2018, 9:07 AM

Hannah Orr

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IA Deadline Sheet.pdf


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Nov 21, 2017, 5:12 AM

Hannah Orr

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Initial Planning Form.pdf


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Nov 21, 2017, 5:12 AM

Hannah Orr

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Internal assessment criteria 2014.pdf


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Nov 21, 2017, 5:12 AM

Hannah Orr

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Internal Assessment.pptx


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Nov 21, 2017, 5:12 AM

Hannah Orr

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Other Project Ideas.pdf


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Nov 21, 2017, 5:12 AM

Hannah Orr

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Project Ideas.pdf


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Nov 21, 2017, 5:12 AM

Hannah Orr

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Simple vs Further Process.pdf


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Nov 21, 2017, 5:12 AM

Hannah Orr

Internal Assessment

A good project for Internal Assessment can be the backbone of a good grade and good experience on the Maths Studies course. Obviously at 20% of the course grade, its importance speaks for itself, but the real value is doubled if students can find a topic that really interests them and use it as an opportunity to practise and make sense of the Mathematics they have studied. Internal Assessment is a huge challenge for students and teachers alike. Hopefully, these pages will be helpful in rising to that challenge! The following outlines this section of the website. Navigate to the sections with the menu on the left. The challenge for teachers with this task involves, helping students to choose the right topic, helping them to get started, deciding a time frame and managing multiple projects that fit within that time frame! Not much then! Students have to have topics that both interest them and have the potential for quality investigation. They have to settle on a starting point and a theme to give their project purpose. You have to pick a time frame that suits both you and the students well, in terms of which parts of the course you have covered and how it fits within the time frame of your schools assessment cycle and then you have to manage the projects in a way that means they fit in to the time allowed!

About IA

This page is intended as a a brief guide to the IA process and the paperwork you should have to hand for planning and running it. This will be most appropriate for those new to teaching the course.

Managing Projects

This is without a doubt the most crucial element for planning. I have spoken to numerous teachers who have all had problems with this and all come up with creative solutions that suit them. There is no one right time to tackle the projects but there are a number of very important considerations! I generally adapt my approach every time I speak to a teacher who gives me a new idea! The aim of these pages is just to pass on some of these ideas and create a checklist of the things that help the management of projects. Also included on this page is a series of tasks for students all under the heading of the 'Project Planner' intended to help students and teachers with the managing the IA part of the course.

Project Ideas

Project ideas can generally be split into two categories. 'Statistyics Projects' and 'Non Statistics Projects' although it is difficult to complete the latter without any statistical analysis, particularly given that much hinges on data/information collection. This page is intended to help teachers inspire students for project ideas and help point out the key elements of a good topic.

Possible Tasks

On this page, to go with the above, there is a list and description of some possible project tasks, based on projects I have seen and those I would quite like to do. This is not intended to be a quick fix for students who should be finding their own ideas, but simply as a tool for inspiration! Each idea has a little explanation about the potential.

Collecting Information/Data

Whatever the project, there is an element of data collection involved. These may be generated by students investigations or from questionnaires or from the Internet. This page talks about this part of the process and offers guidance and ideas for making this part of the process efficient, like the awesome, 'google forms' for questionnaires for example.

Project Problems

This page is intended as a brief guide to some of the major pitfalls involved with this task that are best avoided. Again, this is very much a working web-page as there are likely to be new problems that occur each year. As such the page should be an ever evolving guide that should become more and more helpful.

Practice Projects

Running practice/mini projects in your class can be a great and engaging way both to teach some of the syllabus and introduce/explore the notion of projects. Here are some ideas about how to do this at different points in the syllabus.

Marking & Moderation

The quick and easy solution! I wish! Sorry, I haven't found one yet. This bit can be very time consuming and frustrating, but is obviously of great importance. I have actually begun to enjoy this part of the process but still find it hard to fit in the time it takes! This section offers some guidance on the marking and moderating part, including some example marked projects with commentary and a section on 'Preparing a sample'.

Technology and Projects

This is a page about the impact that using technology can have on projects. It offers a few examples of why it is a really good things and some warnings against some of the pitfalls!

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