Useful site is about custom coursework writing help

Integrated writing task toefl practice

Apr 4, 2018

The difference between winning and losing is most often not quitting. Walt Disney

Hello again, test takers! It’s time for another in-depth look at the TOEFL® test, and today we’ll be focusing on question 1 of the Writing section: the Integrated Writing task. For this question, you will first read a passage about a topic. Then, you'll listen to a short lecture related to the same topic. Finally, you will have 20 minutes to type your response on the computer.

Integrated Writing Task: Step-by-Step

The Integrated Writing task combines reading, listening and writing. You can take notes during the reading and listening portions of the task, and keep your notes in front of you as you complete your response. Here are some quick points to keep in mind for this task:

How Your Response is Evaluated

The tasks in the Writing section will each be given an overall score from 0 to 5. For the Integrated Writing question, raters are looking for three main things:

I hope these tips help you get off to a strong start on the Writing portion of the test. Be sure to check back soon for more insider tips about the TOEFL test!

Want to see what the Writing section is really like? Go to the TOEFL® Test Prep Planner for sample Writing questions and responses.

TOEFL iBT

® Speaking and Writing Webinar

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. TOEFL iBT® Speaking and Writing Webinar.]

Hello and Welcome to this TOEFL iBT® Speaking and Writing Webinar.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Your Facilitator and Schedule. Joanna Wrzesińska – ETS Approved Propell® Facilitator for the TOEFL iBT® test, ETS Global. What we will cover today: Research Base for the TOEFL iBT® test; Overview of the Speaking Section, Question Types and Scoring; Overview of the Writing Section, Question Types and Scoring; Suggested Test Prep Resources.]

Speaker: Joanna Wrzesińska, ETS Approved Propell® Facilitator for the TOEFL iBT® test.

Speaker: My name is Joanna Wrzesińska, and I'm an ETS Approved Propell® Facilitator for the TOEFL iBT® test.

This Webinar will provide you with a better understanding of the TOEFL iBT® Speaking and Writing sections. And this is what we are going to cover today: I will start with briefly presenting the research base for the TOEFL iBT® test. Then, I will pass on to the overview of the Speaking Section and I will discuss the question types and its scoring. Next, I will present the format of the Writing Section, the types of tasks that the test takers need to respond to and I will talk about how this section is scored. Eventually, I will suggest some useful resources that you might want to use in your classrooms. Let's get started.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Research Base for the TOEFL iBT® Test. The TOEFL iBT® test is backed by extensive research. There are over 150 research monographs that have been written specifically on the test. MS-21: The Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening Tasks Important for Academic Success at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels. MS-25: Representing Language Use in the University: Analysis of the TOEFL® 2000 Spoken and Written Academic Language Corpus.]

First, I would like to briefly explain how ETS designed the tasks that are on the TOEFL iBT® test. Since its beginning, the TOEFL® test has had a rigorous, productive and far-ranging research program. ETS has published more than 150 peer- reviewed TOEFL® research reports, technical reports and monographs, many of which have also appeared in academic journals and book volumes. What is more, ETS has conducted multiple pilots to provide a strong research base to support the test design — to ensure that universities can make accurate decisions about applicants' academic English-language proficiency. I would like to mention two studies in particular that helped guide the design of the TOEFL iBT® test.

In the first monograph researchers analyzed the tasks that university professors and students themselves considered as key to academic performance. The results of this task analysis guided test developers in identifying which types of tasks to include on the test. For example, researchers clearly saw that students need to be able to integrate skills in order to be successful in a classroom, and so ETS researchers knew there was a need to develop an assessment that measured integrated skills.

The other monograph I'd like to call your attention to is Monograph 25. For this study, researchers collected a corpus, or a database of language of over 2 million words from lectures, campus conversations outside the classroom, interviews with students and professors, textbooks, professor handouts, and so on in order to analyze the kind of language and kind of interactions that are consistent with an English speaking academic environment. This corpus provided the basis for the development of the types of questions and tasks that are on the TOEFL® test. As you can see, the test uses authentic tasks and authentic language as found in academic English settings.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Assessment of Integrated Skills. Read/Listen (input) to Speak (output) and Write (output). The TOEFL iBT® Test measures students' ability to integrate (combine) their skills… just as they would in real-life academic situations. Summarizing, Synthesizing, Analyzing, Answering questions in class.]

As I mentioned before, language skills are not used in isolation, and so they should not be taught or tested in isolation either. The TOEFL iBT® measures students' ability to integrate their skills just as they would in real-life academic situations.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Speaking Section.]

Let's now have a closer look at the Speaking Section.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Speaking Tasks. Test Takers respond to 6 tasks: 2 independent tasks about familiar topics (Reponses based on personal experience); 4 integrated tasks (2 Reading/Listening/Speaking tasks: 1 academic, 1 campus-based; 2 Listening/Speaking tasks: 1 academic, 1 campus-based; Responses based on what was read and heard); Time: 20 minutes.]

In the Speaking Section the test takers respond to 6 tasks: 2 independent and 4 integrated. In independent tasks the test takers respond to the questions based on their personal experience or opinion. Within integrated tasks 2 tasks require the test takers to use both their reading and listening skills before they record the response. The remaining 2 tasks require test takers to listen to a short passage before they respond to a prompt. For integrated tasks the responses are based on what was read and heard. So test takers need to integrate the information from the source materials in their responses. The total time for this section is 20 minutes.

We will have a look at 2 example speaking tasks today, but detailed description of all speaking tasks can be found online. I will list useful resources towards the end of this webinar.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Speaking Scores. Holistic score; Test takers are rated on: Topic development, Delivery, Language use. Ratings are 0-4; Converted to a scaled score of 0-30.]

Let's talk about how the responses to the speaking tasks are scored. The raters use Scoring Rubric to score responses. A rubric is a scoring guideline with descriptors and it describes performance at different levels of proficiency. For these rubrics, you'll see in a moment that there is a General Description followed by three scoring dimensions: Topic development, Delivery, and Language use, and I will also explain what each of them refers to. The raw score that test taker receives from human raters is then converted to scaled score of 0-30 using a conversion table. Raters cannot assign scores in half-point increments. They need to decide whether a response is level 0-1-2-3 or 4.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Rubrics for Holistic Scoring. Independent SPEAKING Rubrics. (Chart with categories for Score, General Description, Delivery, Language Use and Topic Development).]

Now, these are holistic rubrics, which means that the level of performance is determined by assessing performance across multiple criteria as a whole. This is in contrast to analytic rubrics which determine levels of performance for each criterion separately.

The General Description is the holistic description of the 4 score levels or bands. For Topic Development raters look at whether the test taker has addressed the task — whether they have demonstrated an understanding of the material and made appropriate connections between the content, and whether they conveyed relevant information. For Delivery, raters consider whether the response is clear and fluid, and whether the delivery is sustained throughout the response for overall intelligibility. Lastly, they consider Language Use, which includes both range and accuracy of the grammar and vocabulary used.

There are separate rubrics for independent speaking tasks and separate ones for integrated speaking tasks. Probably you cannot see it very clear on the screen right now, but when you look at the rubrics after this webinar you will notice that the integrated rubrics are similar to the independent speaking rubrics but the descriptors contain relevant information about how well the speaker integrates the information that was heard and read into their responses. So raters are evaluating the question-specific content of the response for integrated tasks.

All the rubrics are published online, and I will provide you with the source later on. We will be referring to the specific parts of the independent rubrics in a minute so you will be able to read them.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Speaking Benchmarks. What is a Benchmark? Listen to a couple of Benchmarks for Speaking Task #2 — Independent Speaking.]

Another important tool that raters use are the benchmark responses. Do you know what a benchmark is? Please feel free to pause this webinar right now and take a minute to think what benchmark responses might mean. The definition of benchmark is a point of reference from which measurements may be made. So the benchmarks for raters provide a point of reference for making their rating decisions of speaking responses.

Raters are required to listen to benchmark responses before the beginning of every scoring session and every time they move to a new item or task. So they "recalibrate" each time they score. Benchmarks are also available to raters to listen to at any point during a scoring session.

We will be listening to a couple of benchmark responses in a minute. In these samples, test takers are responding to the independent speaking task that asks about living on or off campus during a student's first year. Let's listen to the prompt.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Independent Speaking Task. Preparation Time: 15 seconds. Record Time: 45 seconds.]

Male speaker: Some universities require first-year students to live in dormitories on campus. Others allow students to live off campus. Which policy do you think is better for first-year students and why? Include details and examples in your explanation.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. TOEFL iBT® Speaking Section Benchmark Speaking responses. Benchmarks — independent speaking; Each score represents a range of ability. (Scores based on General Description, Delivery, Language Use and Topic Development). Level 4.]

Speaker: Joanna Wrzesińska — Before we listen to the level 4 benchmark for this task please pause the recording and take a minute to read through the descriptors for a level 4 response.

Test Taker Response (Benchmark 4; Slide 11): Uh, I think it's better for the first-year students to live on campus rather than off-campus. Uh, main reason because um, they are new to the city and it's safer for them to live on campus where there's more security, um because they don't know much about the city in the first place. Uh, second of all, it helps them to… become more familiar with their surroundings, where they have to study. It also helps them to meet new people. Uh living in a dorm encourages friendships with people who you might… not… uh, seem very comfortable with the first time. And um, it helps you meet new people, it helps you interact with your seniors, if any living in your dorm.

Speaker: Joanna Wrzesińska — In this response, the speaker provides a clear and coherent response. She is able to maintain a steady, fluid pace with little to no hesitation. Her pronunciation is very good. There is minor but noticeable first-language influence on stress and intonation patterns, but they do not obscure meaning for the listener. She demonstrates a range of vocabulary and grammar that is appropriate to the task. In general, the response is well developed. The speaker clearly states her opinion and provides several reasons for her point of view. She then explains each reason in varying degrees of detail. There is a clear progression of ideas and an ease of presentation typical of a level 4 response. Please note that each score band — 1 through 4 — actually represents a range of abilities. The performance within a level will actually vary slightly from one test taker to the next.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. TOEFL iBT® Speaking Section Benchmark Speaking responses. Benchmarks — independent speaking; Each score represents a range of ability. (Scores based on General Description, Delivery, Language Use and Topic Development). Level 1.]

Now, let's listen to a level 1 response. Before you do so, please pause the recording and take a minute to read through the descriptors for a level 1 response.

Test Taker Response (Benchmark 1; Slide 12): I think… um… the dormitories… living, uh, the students lives in dormitory is… um, very close to each other, students, so… they familiar to each other, so… … mmm… … [person?] student relationship um… communication so… very familiar, um… … ss- um [close?] good [?] for students.

Speaker: Joanna Wrzesińska — Overall, the speaker has an extremely limited range of grammar and vocabulary and struggles to express her ideas. She may be able to string together only a few words and often relies on individual words to convey meaning. As a result very little coherent content is expressed. While she is able to sustain speech for the full 45 seconds, her delivery is choppy and fragmented with numerous pauses and hesitations that requires considerable listener effort.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Integrated Speaking Task. Task #5 — Problem/Solution. A Listening/Speaking Campus Situation Topic. Consists of one source, a listening passage, a single question: Test taker hears a conversation between 2 people about a campus topic — less than 90 seconds; The test taker is asked to briefly summarize the problem and to express a personal opinion about the topic (Note taking allowed, Prep time: 20 seconds, Response time: 60 seconds.]

Now, let's have a look at an example of an integrated task. This is an example of task number 5. In this task a test taker first hears a conversation between two students about a campus situation. Then the test taker is asked to summarize the problem and express a personal opinion about the topic.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Question 6 of 6. (Picture of 2 students talking to each other in a library).]

Students:

MB: Hey Lisa, how's it going?
WB: Hi Mark. Uh, I'm OK, I guess, but my schoolwork is really stressing me out.
MB: Yeah? What's wrong?
WB: Well, I've got a paper to write, and two exams to study for. And a bunch of math problems to finish. It's just so much that I can't concentrate on any of it. I start concentrating on studying for one of my exams, and then I'm like, how long's it gonna take to finish that problem set?
MB: Wow. Sounds like you've got a lot more work than you can handle right now. Look have you talked to some of your professors… I mean, you know, try to explain the problem? Look, you could probably get an extension on your paper, or on the math assignment…
WB: You think? It would give me a little more time to prepare for my exams right now.
MB: Well, I mean another thing that you might do … I mean have you tried making yourself a schedule? I mean that's what I do when I'm feeling overwhelmed.
WB: What does that do for you?
MB: Well, I mean it helps you to focus your energies. You know, you make yourself a chart that shows the next few days and the time till your stuff is due and…
WB: Uh-huh…
MB: I mean think about what you need to do, and when you have to do it by. You know then start filling in your schedule--like, all right 9:00 to 11:30 A.M., study for exam. 12:00 to 3:00, work on problem set. But I mean don't make the time periods too long. Like, don't put in eight hours of studying--you know, you'll get tired, or start worrying about your other work again. But if you keep to your schedule, you know you'll just have to worry about one thing at a time.
WB: Yeah, that might work.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English.]

The students discuss two possible solutions to the woman's problem. Describe the problem. Then state which of the two solutions you prefer and explain why.

Speaker: Joanna Wrzesińska — You just heard the question for this task. Test takers have 20 seconds to prepare, and 60 seconds to respond. Now, let's think about the "key points" needed to respond to this question. What was the woman's problem? What are the two solutions? Which solution would you go for? Please feel free to pause the recording and think about it for a moment.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Key Points. Problem — student is stressed out because she has too much homework — a paper to write, two exams to study for, and math problems to complete. Solutions — student 2 recommends two possible solutions: 1. Ask her professors for an extension on paper and math work; 2. Create a schedule to manage her time and focus her energies. Then test taker states which solution he/she prefers and explains why.]

Here are the key points that a rater would listen for in responses to this task. The key points relate to the "Topic Development" dimension of the scoring rubric. The raters would use integrated speaking rubrics for scoring responses to this task. You will be able to download both scoring rubrics cards from ETS website. I will provide you with appropriate link shortly. I hope this part was useful for you in order to understand how the speaking section looks like and how it's scored.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Writing Section.]

Let's now have a look at the Writing Section.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Writing Tasks. 2 Writing Tasks. 1 integrated task: Reading/Listening/Writing, Short academic reading and listening material, Time: 20 minutes. 1 independent task: Response based on personal experience or opinion, Time: 30 minutes.]

There are 2 Writing Tasks on the TOEFL iBT® test. One integrated and one independent. You can now see the overview of the writing section. I will also describe each task in more detail shortly.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Writing Scores.]

The writing responses are also scored using holistic scoring rubrics. The independent writing responses are judged on the quality of writing, including development of ideas, organization, and the quality and accuracy of the language used. The integrated writing responses are scored on the writing quality and on the completeness and accuracy of the content. Writing responses are scored holistically on a scale of 0 to 5. The average score on the two tasks is then converted to a scaled score of 0 to 30.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Rubrics for Holistic Scoring. Integrated WRITING Rubrics. All Scoring Rubrics are available online at:
www.ets.org/toefl/institutions/scores/guides/.]

This is how the Integrated Writing Rubrics look like. There are also separate rubrics for scoring the independent task. Test takers are not expected to produce a comprehensive essay about a specialized topic — the response can receive a high score even if it contains some errors. All Scoring Rubrics are available online under the link you see on the screen. Please visit the website to review them all. You can pause the recording and do so now, or at any time after watching this webinar.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Innovation in Scoring. The TOEFL iBT® test uses the e-rater® automated scoring engine in a limited and responsible way for the Writing section: Each writing task — one human rater + one automated rating. Combines the judgment of humans for content and meaning and the consistency of automated scoring for linguistic features.]

The TOEFL iBT® test uses the e-rater® automated scoring engine in a limited and responsible way for the Writing Section. Each response is rated by one human rater plus it also receives one automated rating. This approach combines the judgment of humans for content and meaning and the consistency of automated scoring for linguistic features. Using this combination ensures consistent, high quality scores.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Task 1 — Integrated Writing. Test taker sees a 230-300 word reading for 3 minutes. Then test taker hears a 2-minute lecture about the same topic from a different perspective or with additional information. Test taker sees the reading again and also a prompt. Test taker has 20 minutes to respond to the prompt. Suggested word count for response is 150-225 words.]

Now, let's see what exactly the Integrated Writing Task is about. For the integrated task, after reading a passage and hearing a short lecture, students are asked to summarize the points in the listening passage and explain how they relate to the specific points in the reading passage. The listening might challenge arguments made in the reading, or "cast doubt", or it can "support explanations" made in the reading. Typically, an effective response to this task is about 150 to 225 words. However, using fewer or more words is not penalized.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Explore the Integrated Writing Task!]

I would like you now to take part in an activity that will help you understand how the integrated writing task works. Get ready to take notes on the Reading and Listening, and then try to summarize the key points from both.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Passage — In many organizations, perhaps the best way to approach certain new projects is to assemble a group of people into a team. Having a team of people attack a project offers several advantages. First of all, a group of people has a wider range of knowledge, expertise, and skills than any single individual is likely to possess. Also, because of the numbers of people involved and the greater resources they possess, a group can work more quickly in response to the task assigned to it and come up with highly creative solutions to problems and issues. Sometimes these creative solutions come about because a group is more likely to make risky decisions that an individual might not undertake. This is because the group spreads responsibility for a decision to all the members and thus no single individual can be held accountable if the decision turns out to be wrong. Taking part in a group process can be very rewarding for members of the team. Team members who have a voice in making a decision will no doubt feel better about carrying out the work that is entailed by that decision than they might doing work that is imposed on them by others. Also, the individual team member has a much better chance to "shine", to get his or her contributions and ideas not only recognized but recognized as highly significant, because a team's overall results can be more far-reaching and have greater impact than what might have otherwise been possible for the person to accomplish or contribute working alone.]

The test takers will have 3 minutes to read the passage — please pause the recoring now and take 3 minutes to read it. Ok, now let's move on to the listening part. It is a good idea to take some notes while you're listening.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. (Photo of Professor speaking to group of listeners).]

Professor: Now I want to tell you about what one company found when it decided that it would turn over some of its new projects to teams of people, and make the team responsible for planning the projects and getting the work done. After about six months, the company took a look at how well the teams performed.

On virtually every team, some members got almost a "free ride" … they didn't contribute much at all, but if their team did a good job, they nevertheless benefited from the recognition the team got. And what about group members who worked especially well and who provided a lot of insight on problems and issues? Well… the recognition for a job well done went to the group as a whole, no names were named. So it won't surprise you to learn that when the real contributors were asked how they felt about the group process, their attitude was just the opposite of what the reading predicts.

Another finding was that some projects just didn't move very quickly. Why? Because it took so long to reach consensus…it took many, many meetings to build the agreement among group members about how they would move the project along. On the other hand, there were other instances where one or two people managed to become very influential over what their group did. Sometimes when those influencers said "That will never work" about an idea the group was developing, the idea was quickly dropped instead of being further discussed. And then there was another occasion when a couple influencers convinced the group that a plan of theirs was "highly creative." And even though some members tried to warn the rest of the group that the project was moving in directions that might not work, they were basically ignored by other group members. Can you guess the ending to "this" story? When the project failed, the blame was placed on all the members of the group.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Directions: You have 20 minutes to plan and write your response. Your response will be judged on the basis of the quality of your writing and on how well your response presents the points in the lecture and their relationship to the reading passage. Typically, an effective response will be 150 to 225 words. Question: Summarize the points made in the lecture you just heard, explaining how they cast doubt on points made in the reading. In many organizations, perhaps the best way to approach certain new projects is to assemble a group of people into a team. Having a team of people attack a project offers several advantages. First of all, a group of people has a wider range of knowledge, expertise, and skills than any single individual is likely to possess. Also, because of the numbers of people involved and the greater resources they possess, a group can work more quickly in response to the task assigned to it and can come up with highly creative solutions to problems and issues. Sometimes these creative solutions come about because a group is more likely to make risky decisions that an individual might not undertake. This is because the group spreads responsibility for a decision to all the members and thus no single individual can be held accountable if the decision turns out to be wrong. Taking part in a group process can be very rewarding for members of the team. Team members who have a voice in making a decision will no doubt feel better about carrying out the work that is entailed by that decision than they might doing work that is imposed on them by others. Also, the individual team member has a much better chance to "shine", to get his or her contributions and ideas not only recognized but recognized as highly significant, because a team's overall results can be more far-reaching and have greater impact than what might have otherwise been possible for the person to accomplish or contribute working alone.]

Speaker: Joanna Wrzesińska — This is what the screen that test takers see look like. The general directions are at the top and students can read and hear the question, which you will also hear in a moment.

Male speaker: Summarize the points made in the lecture you just heard, explaining how they cast doubt on points made in the reading.

Speaker: Joanna Wrzesińska — What do students need to do to answer this question? What information should the response contain? Please pause the recording for a moment to think about it.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Key Points for Integrated Writing Task: Some members of a group are much better contributors than others, but since the rewards and blame are shared equally, a good contributor often earns less praise and more blame than is fair. Contrary to the reading's claim that being part of a team is a rewarding experience and that working in a team earns one less blame than working alone. Team work can progress very slowly, due to the time it takes to reach consensus. Contrary to the reading's claim that team work proceeds quickly due to the wider range of resources contributed by the individual members. One or two members can dominate the others, pushing bad decisions or ignoring good suggestions. Contrary to the reading's claim that team work allows all members to have a voice.]

Here are the key points that the rater would look at, along with the rubric while rating this specific Integrated Writing Task. You may want to pause now to go through the key points you see on the screen. A successful response would include all the three points. And in a couple of minutes you will be able to have a look at examples of stronger and weaker responses to this particular task.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Task 2-Independent Writing. Test taker sees a prompt that asks for an opinion about an issue; Test taker is advised to use specific reasons and examples to support that opinion; Test taker has 30 minutes in total for preparation, writing and revision; Suggested word count for response is 300 words.]

Now, let's have a closer look at the Independent Task. For this task, test takers should take a position and then use reasons and examples to support their opinion. There is no correct or incorrect answer. Test takers use their own knowledge and experience to answer the question. Effective responses are typically about 300 words long, but there is no minimum or maximum word limit. A standard English language computer keyboard is used for the TOEFL iBT® test. It is recommended that students practice typing on a QWERTY keyboard before taking the test.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Task 2-Independent Writing. Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Always telling the truth is the most important consideration in any relationship. Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer.]

Here's an example of an independent item. Do you agree or disagree with the following statement? Always telling the truth is the most important consideration in any relationship. Use specific reasons and examples to support your answer. Students should take a position and then use reasons and examples to support that opinion. Again, there is no correct or incorrect answer.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Benchmark Writing Responses. Benchmarks — Integrated Writing task. Annotations provide narrative description of the level. Raters are also provided with key points for scoring the content. Please review the benchmark responses and annotations at:
https://www.ets.org/Media/Tests/TOEFL/pdf/ibt_writing_sample_responses.pdf.]

OK, now that you are very familiar with both types of tasks and you can have a look at the benchmark writing responses for the integrated and independent writing tasks that I have just presented. They are available online under the link provided on the slide. You will need to pause the recording to have a closer look at the benchmark responses. You may also decide to review the scoring rubrics and benchmarks again at any time after watching this webinar. I hope these activities were useful for you in order to understand how the writing section looks like and how it's scored.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Additional Resources for Speaking and Writing Sections.]

Before we finish, let's look at some useful resources.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. For you. Teachers and Advisors Section — One location for all your resource needs: https://www.ets.org/toefl/teachers_advisors. Videos Available: TOEFL® Resource Series for Teachers, Research Behind the TOEFL® Program, How ETS Scores the TOEFL iBT® Test: https://www.ets.org/toefl/teachers_advisors/video_library.]

Please make sure to visit TOEFL® Teachers and Advisors website which contains many useful resources including the advisor toolkit, research information, and a series of informative videos for teachers. As you can see on the screen there is a video about How ETS Scores the TOEFL iBT® Test. In the video, ETS Assessment Experts provide even more detailed information about the scoring processes. For example, you can learn more about the raters' training and their work. I strongly recommend watching the videos! Another reason to visit the Teachers and Advisors website is to sign up for receiving quarterly updates from the TOEFL® Program and stay informed of the latest Program news.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. More Information on TGA Site.]

Please remember to refer your students to the official website for test takers: www.toeflgoanywhere.org, which includes TOEFL® Destination Search, registration information, test preparation tips and much more.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Inside the TOEFL® Test. Video series gives an in-depth look at the Reading, Listening, Speaking and Writing questions, including: Question structure, Scoring criteria, Skill-building tips, Sample responses (Speaking and Writing). www.ets.org/toefl/teachers_advisors/video_library.]

'Inside the TOEFL® Test' is a video series that offers and in-depth look at all the 4 sections of the TOEFL iBT® Test. You and your students can learn more about the Question structure, Scoring criteria, Skill-building tips and you can view some sample responses for the Speaking and Writing sections of the test.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. TOEFL® TV Channel on YouTube® — Includes video tips from teachers and students. Learn about TOEFL® destinations. Features ETS-produced videos about the test: Inside the TOEFL® Test, Meet the Study Group. 81,000+ subscribers. Over 4.1 million views (as of September 2016).]

There is also a TOEFL® TV channel on YouTube® that includes the 'Inside the TOEFL® Test' series that I have just mentioned, but there are also many other useful videos available there. For example, you can find videos by other teachers like yourself in which they share their test preparation tips.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Free TOEFL iBT® Test Prep. TOEFL iBT® Interactive Sampler: Free unlimited access to interactive Reading and Listening questions, and sample responses to Writing and Speaking questions. TOEFL iBT® Test Questions: Previous questions to help become familiar with the types of questions and content on the actual test and understand how test is structured and formatted. TOEFL® Test Prep Planner: An 8-week preparation plan that contains tips and activities to build each of the four skills. TOEFL iBT® Quick Prep: Free practice tool with real TOEFL iBT® test questions from past tests with downloadable audio files. www.ets.org/toefl/prep.]

Another set of great resources is the sample test questions that you can download for free from the website. The questions either have interactive format like the TOEFL iBT® Interactive Sampler, or you can use the TOEFL iBT® Test questions or TOEFL iBT® Quick Prep, which can be easily printed out and used in the classroom. Another idea is to familiarize your students with the TOEFL® Test Prep Planner which has not only sample questions but also contains a detailed description of the test format, an 8-week preparation plan and Scoring Rubrics for Speaking and Writing. Make sure to check all of these fantastic resources.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. TOEFL® Test Preparation: The Insider's Guide. The TOEFL® MOOC is a free 6-week test preparation course designed by the experts who create the TOEFL test: Week 1: Introduction, Week 2: Reading, Week 3: Listening, Week 4: Speaking, Week 5: Writing, Week 6: Test Day and Beyond. Mix of text, short video lectures, sample questions from past tests and quizzes. Please check website for next enrollment date: ets.org/toefl/insidersguide.]

Another brilliant resource is titled: TOEFL® Test Preparation: The Insider's Guide, which is a free 6 week free internet course led by ETS experts. Even though this MOOC, which means Massive Open Online Course is predominantly taken by students, the instructors can get an even better understanding of how each section of the test looks like and what additional activities and sources they can use in their classrooms. Please check website for the next enrollment date.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. TOEFL iBT® Test Preparation. Official TOEFL iBT® Tests, V2 — NEW! - 5 real practice tests + interactive DVD-ROM. The Official Guide to the TOEFL® Test, 4th Edition: Test prep handbook from ETS. TOEFL® Practice Online: Complete online practice tests. TOEFL® Online Prep Course: Up to 80 hours of content. TOEFL® Value Packs: Save up to 38% on official prep and other resources.]

Last but not least, there are a number of excellent paid test preparation materials including: The Official TOEFL iBT® Tests Volume 1 and 2; The Official Guide to the TOEFL® test, TOEFL® Practice Online; TOEFL® Online Prep Course and TOEFL® Value Packs, which enable you and your students to purchase sets of materials at reduced prices.

On-screen: [ETS TOEFL®. Resource Series for Teachers. The key to success for teaching English. Thank you! To stay up-to-date with all available materials, please make sure to periodically visit www.ets.org/toefl/teachers_advisors.]

Thank you very much for taking time to view this webinar, which I hope you found useful. Let me wish you best of luck in your everyday efforts as you help your students reach their goals.

End of TOEFL iBT® Speaking and Writing Webinar.

Video duration: 28:43

Previous: Help write a thesis statement
Next post: Politeness strategies thesis writing