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Writing dbq ap world history thesis

Jun 1, 2018

AP World History Writing the Thesis Statement and DBQ Essay Slide 2 What does a good thesis statement do? Takes a stand Answers the question Previews the argument Slide 3 Thesis Write a thesis statement that outlines what you plan to address in your essay. The thesis statement is not a restating of the question. It is an introduction that includes a careful constructed paragraph that lays out what you will write about. Slide 4 Thesis Statement If your thesis statement stated, some things are similar and some things are different; that is not a thesis statement. If you begin to write your essay in the introductory paragraph, you have not written a good thesis statement. A thesis statement introduces the three areas you were tasked to address and weaves them into that paragraph. Slide 5 Thesis Statement Example of a good thesis statement: –Two of the most important early civilizations were those of Mesopotamia and Egypt. They developed strong political and social systems that were structured around a strong emphasis on religion. Yet the development of both civilizations was shaped through each ones environment and resulted in two uniquely separate cultures. Slide 6 Writing the Essay Once you have written a strong thesis, you have an outline to help guide your essay. Dont include details in your thesis paragraph. You do that in succeeding paragraphs. Conclusion needs to restate the main ideas of your essay. In other words - tell them what you are going to tell them, tell them with details that support your thesis and sum up by a strong conclusion. Slide 7 Data Based Question (DBQ) Essay You will be given between 4 and 10 documents to group and analyze. There is a time limit of 40 minutes in which to write the essay and you will be given an additional 10 minutes to group and analyze the documents. Documents may include maps, pictures, and charts. Slide 8 How do you analyze the documents? You must look for and state three (3) points of view (POVs). POVs are identified as to the following: –Who –What –When –Where –Why Slide 9 Document POVs What is the main idea or topic being said in the document? Why would this person be saying/creating this document at this time and place? How does the document help me answer the question that is being asked? Slide 10 Scoring the DBQ There are a total of 9 points for the DBQ. The basic core consists of either 6 or 7 points. The expanded core will make up the rest of the total points. YOU MUST SCORE ALL BASIC POINTS IN ORDER TO RECEIVE EXPANDED CORE POINTS. Slide 11 Components of the DBQ Essay – Core Points (MANDATORY) Thesis statement that is not just a restating of the question. Using all but one of the documents in your essay. Grouping and thoughtfully analyzing the documents. DONT LIST DOCUMENTS! Stating the point of view/perspective on minimum of three (3) of the documents Using the documents to support your thesis. Adding an additional document that would help support your thesis. Slide 12 Components of the DBQ Essay – Expanded Core Extremely strong thesis statement. Adding more than one additional document to your essay. Completely and thoroughly answering the question. Remember, you must score all basic points in order to receive expanded core. Slide 13 How I grade the DBQ Essay for AP Basic core points are divided into 100. Each basic point will then be worth whatever the result is. Example: –6 basic core points divided into 100= 16.67 points. –Essay is then graded using the following format: thesis statement, used all but one document, analyzed and grouped documents, noted point of view/perspective in at least three documents, added an additional document to help support the essay, answered the question.

AP World History Writing the Thesis Statement and DBQ Essay Slide 2 What does a good thesis statement do? Takes a stand Answers the question Previews the argument Slide 3 Thesis Write a thesis statement that outlines what you plan to address in your essay. The thesis statement is not a restating of the question. It is an introduction that includes a careful constructed paragraph that lays out what you will write about. Slide 4 Thesis Statement If your thesis statement stated, some things are similar and some things are different; that is not a thesis statement. If you begin to write your essay in the introductory paragraph, you have not written a good thesis statement. A thesis statement introduces the three areas you were tasked to address and weaves them into that paragraph. Slide 5 Thesis Statement Example of a good thesis statement: –Two of the most important early civilizations were those of Mesopotamia and Egypt. They developed strong political and social systems that were structured around a strong emphasis on religion. Yet the development of both civilizations was shaped through each ones environment and resulted in two uniquely separate cultures. Slide 6 Writing the Essay Once you have written a strong thesis, you have an outline to help guide your essay. Dont include details in your thesis paragraph. You do that in succeeding paragraphs. Conclusion needs to restate the main ideas of your essay. In other words - tell them what you are going to tell them, tell them with details that support your thesis and sum up by a strong conclusion. Slide 7 Data Based Question (DBQ) Essay You will be given between 4 and 10 documents to group and analyze. There is a time limit of 40 minutes in which to write the essay and you will be given an additional 10 minutes to group and analyze the documents. Documents may include maps, pictures, and charts. Slide 8 How do you analyze the documents? You must look for and state three (3) points of view (POVs). POVs are identified as to the following: –Who –What –When –Where –Why Slide 9 Document POVs What is the main idea or topic being said in the document? Why would this person be saying/creating this document at this time and place? How does the document help me answer the question that is being asked? Slide 10 Scoring the DBQ There are a total of 9 points for the DBQ. The basic core consists of either 6 or 7 points. The expanded core will make up the rest of the total points. YOU MUST SCORE ALL BASIC POINTS IN ORDER TO RECEIVE EXPANDED CORE POINTS. Slide 11 Components of the DBQ Essay – Core Points (MANDATORY) Thesis statement that is not just a restating of the question. Using all but one of the documents in your essay. Grouping and thoughtfully analyzing the documents. DONT LIST DOCUMENTS! Stating the point of view/perspective on minimum of three (3) of the documents Using the documents to support your thesis. Adding an additional document that would help support your thesis. Slide 12 Components of the DBQ Essay – Expanded Core Extremely strong thesis statement. Adding more than one additional document to your essay. Completely and thoroughly answering the question. Remember, you must score all basic points in order to receive expanded core. Slide 13 How I grade the DBQ Essay for AP Basic core points are divided into 100. Each basic point will then be worth whatever the result is. Example: –6 basic core points divided into 100= 16.67 points. –Essay is then graded using the following format: thesis statement, used all but one document, analyzed and grouped documents, noted point of view/perspective in at least three documents, added an additional document to help support the essay, answered the question.

Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone. Pablo Picasso

How to Write a Thesis Statement

Thesis Statements

WHAT THIS HANDOUT IS ABOUT

This handout describes what a thesis statement is, how thesis statements work in your writing, and how you can craft or refine one for your draft.

INTRODUCTION

Writing in college often takes the form of persuasion—convincing others that you have an interesting, logical point of view on the subject you are studying. Persuasion is a skill you practice regularly in your daily life. You persuade your roommate to clean up, your parents to let you borrow the car, your friend to vote for your favorite candidate or policy. In college, course assignments often ask you to make a persuasive case in writing. You are asked to convince your reader of your point of view. This form of persuasion, often called academic argument, follows a predictable pattern in writing. After a brief introduction of your topic, you state your point of view on the topic directly and often in one sentence. This sentence is the thesis statement, and it serves as a summary of the argument you’ll make in the rest of your paper.

WHAT IS A THESIS STATEMENT?

A thesis statement:

If your assignment asks you to take a position or develop a claim about a subject, you may need to convey that position or claim in a thesis statement near the beginning of your draft. The assignment may not explicitly state that you need a thesis statement because your instructor may assume you will include one. When in doubt, ask your instructor if the assignment requires a thesis statement. When an assignment asks you to analyze, to interpret, to compare and contrast, to demonstrate cause and effect, or to take a stand on an issue, it is likely that you are being asked to develop a thesis and to support it persuasively. 

HOW DO I GET A THESIS?

A thesis is the result of a lengthy thinking process. Formulating a thesis is not the first thing you do after reading an essay assignment. Before you develop an argument on any topic, you have to collect and organize evidence, look for possible relationships between known facts (such as surprising contrasts or similarities), and think about the significance of these relationships. Once you do this thinking, you will probably have a “working thesis,” a basic or main idea, an argument that you think you can support with evidence but that may need adjustment along the way.

Writers use all kinds of techniques to stimulate their thinking and to help them clarify relationships or comprehend the broader significance of a topic and arrive at a thesis statement.

HOW DO I KNOW IF MY THESIS IS STRONG?

If there’s time, run it by your instructor or make an appointment at the Writing Center to get some feedback. Even if you do not have time to get advice elsewhere, you can do some thesis evaluation of your own. When reviewing your first draft and its working thesis,ask yourself the following:

EXAMPLES

Suppose you are taking a course on 19th-century America, and the instructor hands out the following essay assignment: Compare and contrast the reasons why the North and South fought the Civil War. You turn on the computer and type out the following:

This weak thesis restates the question without providing any additional information. You will expand on this new information in the body of the essay, but it is important that the reader know where you are heading. A reader of this weak thesis might think, “What reasons? How are they the same? How are they different?” Ask yourself these same questions and begin to compare Northern and Southern attitudes (perhaps you first think, “The South believed slavery was right, and the North thought slavery was wrong”). Now, push your comparison toward an interpretation—why did one side think slavery was right and the other side think it was wrong? You look again at the evidence, and you decide that you are going to argue that the North believed slavery was immoral while the South believed it upheld the Southern way of life. You write:

Now you have a working thesis! Included in this working thesis is a reason for the war and some idea of how the two sides disagreed over this reason. As you write the essay, you will probably begin to characterize these differences more precisely, and your working thesis may start to seem too vague. Maybe you decide that both sides fought for moral reasons, and that they just focused on different moral issues. You end up revising the working thesis into a final thesis that really captures the argument in your paper:

Compare this to the original weak thesis. This final thesis presents a way of interpreting evidence that illuminates the significance of the question. Keep in mind that this is one of many possible interpretations of the Civil War—it is not the one and only right answer to the question. There isn’t one right answer; there are only strong and weak thesis statements and strong and weak uses of evidence.

Let’s look at another example. Suppose your literature professor hands out the following assignment in a class on the American novel: Write an analysis of some aspect of Mark Twain’s novel Huckleberry Finn. “This will be easy,” you think. “I loved Huckleberry Finn!” You grab a pad of paper and write:

Why is this thesis weak? Think about what the reader would expect from the essay that follows: you will most likely provide a general, appreciative summary of Twain’s novel. The question did not ask you to summarize; it asked you to analyze. Your professor is probably not interested in your opinion of the novel; instead, she wants you to think about why it’s such a great novel—what do Huck’s adventures tell us about life, about America, about coming of age, about race relations, etc.? First, the question asks you to pick an aspect of the novel that you think is important to its structure or meaning—for example, the role of storytelling, the contrasting scenes between the shore and the river, or the relationships between adults and children. Now you write:

Here’s a working thesis with potential: you have highlighted an important aspect of the novel for investigation; however, it’s still not clear what your analysis will reveal. Your reader is intrigued, but is still thinking, “So what? What’s the point of this contrast? What does it signify?” Perhaps you are not sure yet, either. That’s fine—begin to work on comparing scenes from the book and see what you discover. Free write, make lists, jot down Huck’s actions and reactions. Eventually you will be able to clarify for yourself, and then for the reader, why this contrast matters. After examining the evidence and considering your own insights, you write:

This final thesis statement presents an interpretation of a literary work based on an analysis of its content. Of course, for the essay itself to be successful, you must now present evidence from the novel that will convince the reader of your interpretation.



SPECIAL THANKS TO: Mr. Brynes of Leonardtown High School

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